Fiction, Uncategorized

Book Review of “The Captured Bride” by author Michelle Griep

 

Book Review

The Captured Bride is the third book in the Daughter’s of the Mayflower series. My favorite part of the Captured Bride is the characters. There are at least three that are well-developed and complex. You feel like you know them, at times better than they know themselves. More than one is torn about where they belong, and to who they owe their loyalty. A dangerous and unexpected mission unites them, but at what price?

This story is set in America during the mid 1700s, during the French and Indian War. The main female lead is half Mohawk, and the male lead is half French. Both have to live their lives straddling two very different cultures in a dangerous time-period.

I did enjoy this story, but felt that it wrapped up rather quickly.  It was a slow, intense build up … with a too-quick finish.

I’m rating this one 3.5 out of 5 trail-side campfires.


Cover Review

No pun intended but this is a captivating cover. However, I don’t know that without the text I would know that the woman is a person who has been kidnapped. The light rope around her right arm actually seems like it could even be a part of her clothing? Although I love the braid, and that the locket from the storyline is also in the photo, I feel like this image makes the leading lady seem more like a damsel in distress than the main character, Mercy Lytton, ever really was in the story. Even under capture she is a determined woman that displays a fierceness that doesn’t seem depicted in this cover. I also don’t get any sense of her Mohawk heritage, which is apparently obvious.

I also don’t get a clear sense of the time period from her attire. I have a vague sense that it is a historical novel, but I can’t tell the time period without further explanation elsewhere.

The cover does get my attention … it’s just not super clear on what it’s conveying.

I’m rating this cover 3.5 trail-side campfires out of 5.

Please note: I received this title from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.

Fiction

Book Review of “The Weaver’s Daughter” by Sarah E. Ladd

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Book Review

“The Weaver’s Daughter” is a Regency era Romance novel. Set in the early 1800s in Yorkshire, England this novel is at first glance a thematic Romeo and Juliet with two young people fighting their attraction for each other who come from families which have been bitter wool-industry rivals for decades.

Although I have nothing against romance novels, I enjoy when the main plot is not all about the boy and girl getting hitched. Thankfully, this novel also includes a well-plotted mystery, more than one suspicious suspect, and characters that are complex and not one-dimensional.

This novel has strong tension that keeps you turning pages. I read it on a camping weekend in only a couple of days!

The only negative thing I felt toward the story is the need for variety when describing intuitive fear felt by the characters. Their neck hair was standing on end a little too frequently … but that is being SUPER knit-picky, and I know it. That was the only thing I would change, and obviously it didn’t suck me out of the story for very long or I wouldn’t have finished it so quickly.

Overall I loved this story, and felt it was well placed within a rocky time in history for mill-workers, weavers, and their owners.  I think both Christian and non-Christian readers will be happy when they get to the truth of the mysteries within this story. As it does contain romance, I do think it will attract more female than male readers.

I’m rating this one 4.5 out of 5 snowy lambs.


Cover Review

I confess that the first thing that caught my eye for choosing this particular book was the inspirational fiction sticker my library had stuck to the spine. I knew what kind of book I wanted to read that weekend, and that was the fastest way to find it. The spine itself wasn’t particularly eye-catching in design. There is only a faint snowy building blending into the white of the spine. [The author’s name was even covered up by the numerous library stickers.] However, when I did pull it off the shelf, by design, it was obviously a historical romance of some kind … and I recognized the author’s name as one I had enjoyed reading in the past.

I could tell by the dress on the cover model that it was likely set in the late 1700s or early 1800s – beyond that I didn’t know much except that it looked like a very cold environment.  The warm muff on the model’s arm steals a little of the focus on this cover. It is only thanks to the designer’s choice to run the title very large from edge to edge (over the top of the muff) that it maintains being the focal point.

I’m rating this cover 3.5 snowy lambs out of 5.

Please note: I borrowed this book from my local library. No expectation of a review at all was expected by any party.

Fiction

Review of “Where We Belong” by Lynn Austin

 

Book Review

“Where We Belong” is a Victorian era adventure story. It features quite a bit of time-hopping within the two sisters’ lifetimes – but what lifetimes! Through their eyes we witness the hurdles in place for women of their time – in education, in exotic travel … and yes, in romance too.

I would say that Christian women are definitely the target audience for this particular novel, and if you also happen to have a love of archeology … or just Indiana Jones movies, then you would also likely enjoy the journeys of these two sisters. Set primarily in Chicago, this novel also paints a portrait of life in the windy city before, during and after the great Chicago fire.

This is a clean book, it contains nothing inappropriate for young adult readers – however, I don’t feel it is one they would be drawn to particularly.  [At the beginning of the story the sisters are already middle-aged.]

I’m rating this one 4 out of 5 relics.


Cover Review

This cover is beautiful. Your gaze is automatically drawn to both the period costumes of the young ladies … and the Egyptian skyline they are staring at beyond them. It accomplishes exactly what it sets out to do. You are immediately sucked into an Egyptian travel adventure, and you know that it is a historical.

Having the author’s name more prominent than the book’s title is also a smart move. I loved the cover art, but I will admit that what sold me on buying the book was the name of the author. I had previously read several of Lynn’s novels, including “Until We Reach Home” and “While We are Far Apart” in digital format and loved them both. I knew it would be well written, and worth supporting the author.

The only reason I am not giving the cover a full 5 out of 5 relics is that the cover does it’s job – but to get a full 5 out of 5 from me it would have to stand out from the crowd just a little more – to be stuck in my memory more permanently. Though I love this cover, and it is doing it’s job, I likely won’t remember if I’ve already read this one in a few years without reading the back cover blurb. [Yes – I have picked up books I’ve already read on more than one occasion!]

I’m rating this cover 4.75 relics out of 5.

Please note: I purchased this book with my own funds. This was not a copy I was given for review.

Fiction

Review of “The Pirate Bride” by author Kathleen Y’barbo

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Book Review

“The Pirate Bride” is the second novel to release in a new, multi-author series – The Daughters of the Mayflower – being published by Barbour Publishing. Release date is April 1, 2018. For me, the main female character, Maribel Cordoba, is a mixture of the plucky, inquisitive Anne from Anne of Green Gables and the more determined, [and let’s face it, pirate-fixated] Elizabeth Swan from Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean series. I happen to love both of those story-lines, so Maribel was rather a fun character.

This book is very clean, and is not at all preachy. For these reasons I believe both a Young Adult reader and the average Christian fiction reader would enjoy it. I also believe it is  aimed at a female reader more than at a male reader. Though there is some high-seas drama involving cannon ball fire etc. the motivation to follow the story through until the end is primarily via the point of view of the female lead. And … as the title’s inclusion of the word ‘bride’ gives away – it is a bit of a romance. Not that there isn’t any adventure too …

I’m rating this one 4 out of 5 anchors.


Cover Review

The trend of the closely cropped main character filling the cover space has grown on me. I used to be a little bothered by it to be completely honest. After much examination I think it’s tied closely to the fact that I’m of a certain age … and cutting off people’s heads in photos was a big no-no when cameras still required the use of film. [And my ten-year-old just wandered into the room and asked me why they were showing the lady’s back? ha ha] But it’s 2018 … and now that this trend has been around a few years to grow on me I find this style to be artistically expressive.

I am free to picture the rest of the character on the cover – much the same as I do the other characters when I’m reading the novel itself. The beautiful blue color of her dress against the elegant white lace, and white text is both eye-catching and effective. I would be drawn to this novel if I spotted it on the shelf or saw it for sale in my favorite online store. The only negative I still harbor is that without the text I would have no idea it involved pirates. I feel like there is room in the skyline for at least the faintest hint of a ship’s mast on the horizon? It could be extremely subtle, but right now … on first glance, I only know it’s a historical due to the style of the dress.

I’m rating this cover 4.5 anchors out of 5.

Please note: I received this title from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.

 

Uncategorized

Book & Cover Review of "A Noble Groom" by Jody Hedlund

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Book Review
“A Noble Groom” is a new twist on the ‘mail order bride’ story type. Set in 1880 in Forestville, Michigan our heroine is a new widow who isn’t very eager to enter into what would be her second arranged marriage. Her first husband was abusive and a gambler. Annalisa is expecting their second child, and will likely lose her farm if she doesn’t get a new husband.
Annalisa’s farm is part of a  community consisting entirely of immigrants from Germany that are working together to make it through homesteading newly broken American ground together. As a community they decide to write to their families back in Germany to get her a husband. Annalisa is fearful that a new husband may be even worse than her last … but has long ago given up on her girlhood dreams of marrying for love.
While she waits for her prospective cousin/groom to arrive from the Old Country a young man named Carl arrives offering to help. He claims to have been a school teacher, and he knows very little about farming – but his charming and gentle ways give Annalisa new hope that all men aren’t like her former husband. But do her feelings lie deeper than that for this man? And is he really a former teacher? The story is worth the read to find out!
Cover Review
It’s obvious by the outfit Carl Richards arrives wearing that he is NOT a farmer. The community chooses to believe his lie that he is a schoolteacher, but … his clothes look a little more refined than even that profession. However, Carl has a letter from a well respected family member and they choose to take him into their community on faith. This cover design helps to accentuate just how much Carl doesn’t fit in when he arrives. This pampered son of a nobleman learns quickly what he must to survive (and hide) among this immigrant community.
The stormy sky in the background was a nice choice to reflect the tension and turmoil of this young man’s situation. The hint of barn and handmade plow next to the well-dressed and freshly shaven young man on this cover seem incongruent … because they ARE. Readers of historical romance will be drawn to the heroic stance and good looks of this prospective groom. Once again, the photo has taken center stage in this books design, but I believe it is successful and the title and author information are well-handled. I at first questioned the choice of bright green for the title text, but it has grown on me. It clashes a little with the other colors in the photo, but this helps it to stand out and get noticed.
*This book was provided by the publisher for review under no guarantee of a positive review.