Fiction

Book Review of “The Weaver’s Daughter” by Sarah E. Ladd

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Book Review

“The Weaver’s Daughter” is a Regency era Romance novel. Set in the early 1800s in Yorkshire, England this novel is at first glance a thematic Romeo and Juliet with two young people fighting their attraction for each other who come from families which have been bitter wool-industry rivals for decades.

Although I have nothing against romance novels, I enjoy when the main plot is not all about the boy and girl getting hitched. Thankfully, this novel also includes a well-plotted mystery, more than one suspicious suspect, and characters that are complex and not one-dimensional.

This novel has strong tension that keeps you turning pages. I read it on a camping weekend in only a couple of days!

The only negative thing I felt toward the story is the need for variety when describing intuitive fear felt by the characters. Their neck hair was standing on end a little too frequently … but that is being SUPER knit-picky, and I know it. That was the only thing I would change, and obviously it didn’t suck me out of the story for very long or I wouldn’t have finished it so quickly.

Overall I loved this story, and felt it was well placed within a rocky time in history for mill-workers, weavers, and their owners.  I think both Christian and non-Christian readers will be happy when they get to the truth of the mysteries within this story. As it does contain romance, I do think it will attract more female than male readers.

I’m rating this one 4.5 out of 5 snowy lambs.


Cover Review

I confess that the first thing that caught my eye for choosing this particular book was the inspirational fiction sticker my library had stuck to the spine. I knew what kind of book I wanted to read that weekend, and that was the fastest way to find it. The spine itself wasn’t particularly eye-catching in design. There is only a faint snowy building blending into the white of the spine. [The author’s name was even covered up by the numerous library stickers.] However, when I did pull it off the shelf, by design, it was obviously a historical romance of some kind … and I recognized the author’s name as one I had enjoyed reading in the past.

I could tell by the dress on the cover model that it was likely set in the late 1700s or early 1800s – beyond that I didn’t know much except that it looked like a very cold environment.  The warm muff on the model’s arm steals a little of the focus on this cover. It is only thanks to the designer’s choice to run the title very large from edge to edge (over the top of the muff) that it maintains being the focal point.

I’m rating this cover 3.5 snowy lambs out of 5.

Please note: I borrowed this book from my local library. No expectation of a review at all was expected by any party.